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Archive for March 4th, 2012

I am thrilled and honored that I was even thought of for this award. The blogging world of wordpress is so very supportive and I am blessed that so many people are willing to look at, ponder, and sit with ideas of dying and loss…. Much gratitude!!!!

Not Just Sassy on the Inside

An embarrassingly long time ago Dimitie Kendall nominated me for a Versatile Blogger award. One of the requirements (full set of rules below) is to nominate 15 more bloggers and at the time I’d not been reading blogs long enough to have that many I’d been reading for any length of time. Dimitie’s main blog is Dimitie Kendall and is another spiritual journey blog. She’s also started a new blog called Eco Fashion Asia. Thanks so much Dimitie.

Today Karen Wan nominated me for the Sunshine Award. Karen has a writing blog that brings a spiritual perspective to blog writing. Her blog is Writing Your Destiny. Thank you Karen, for naming me.

To be really clear, in these awards everyone who is nominated is a winner, or nominated=winner, so no one is a winner more than another and the order I’ve put them in has to do with nothing…

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Reprise #609

I love this idea in terms of loss… we yearn so much to have that person with us and yet, we have become the best part of that person. we carry that relationship with us until our last breath. part of our suffering is in the belief that we are a separate self and that “someone who is not me” left “me”… but there is no me and there is no someone… there is just love…

Bliss Blog

Notice

 what

 you

 longed

 for

 was

 already – always

 constantly

 here,

 all

 by

 itself;

 alive / awake,

 alert / present

 in

 this

 moment

 we

 call

 now.

.

.

.

.

“S o m e t h i n g   I s   T h e r e . . .”   * N E W   V I D E O !

S o m e t h i n g . . . ”   * N E W   B O O K !

.

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If you have enjoyed these posts and you would like to make a donation to support my work, your contribution would be gratefully appreciated…

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(c) Copyright – Michael Sean Symonds. All Rights Reserved…

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Loneliness

Life is but a dream!

What a strange thing is loneliness, and how frightening it is! We never allow ourselves to get too close to it; and if by chance we do, we quickly run away from it. We will do anything to escape from loneliness, to cover it up. Our conscious and unconscious preoccupation seems to be to avoid it or to overcome it. Avoiding and overcoming loneliness are equally futile; though suppressed or neglected, the pain, the problem, is still there. You may lose yourself in a crowd, and yet be utterly lonely; you may be intensely active, but loneliness silently creeps upon you; put the book down, and it is there. Amusements and drinks cannot drown loneliness; you may temporarily evade it, but when the laughter and the effects of alcohol are over, the fear of loneliness returns. You may be ambitious and successful, you may have vast power over others, you…

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Broken Heart

Broken Heart (Photo credit: CarbonNYC)

Grief is not work.  It is not something we do and get through.  Grief is not just about going to support groups or keeping a stiff upper lip.  And you don’t just get on with your life.

Grief is a life long process of learning to live with a loss or change and is about re-establishing balance and meaning in your life when a change or loss has occurred.  Grief is about learning to embrace a wounded heart, finding compassion for ourselves, and honoring our experience with others.

Metta, Jennifer

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A Place of Refuge

From:  My Grandfather’s Blessings by Rachel Naomi Remen, M.D.

Perhaps the most important thing we bring to another person is the silence in us.  Not the sort of silence that is filled with unspoken criticism or hard withdrawal.  The sort of silence that is a place of refuge, of rest, of acceptance of someone as they are.  We are all hungry for this other silence.  It is hard to find.  In its presence we can remember something beyond the moment, a strength on which to build a life.  Silence is a place of great power and healing.  Silence is God’s lap.

Many things grow the silence in us, among them simply growing older.  We may then become more of a refuge than a rescuer, a witness to the process of life and the wisdom of acceptance. 

A highly skilled AIDS doctor once told me that she keeps a picture of her grandmother in her home and sits before it for a few minutes every day before she leaves for work.  Her grandmother was an Italian-born woman who held her family close.  Her wisdom was of the earth.  Once when Louisa was very small, her kitten was killed in an accident.  It was her first experience with death and she had been devastated.  Her parents had encouraged her not to be sad, telling her that the kitten was in heaven now with God.  Despite these assurances, she had not been comforted.  She prayed to God, asking Him to give her kitten back.  But God did not respond.

In her anguish she turned to her grandmother and asked, “Why?”  Her grandmother had not told her that her kitten was in heaven as so many of the other adults had.  Instead, she had simply held her and reminded her of the time when her grandfather had died.  She, too, had prayed to God, but God had not brought Grandpa back.  She did not know why.  Louisa had turned into the soft warmth of her grandmother’s shoulder then and sobbed.  When she was able to look up, she saw that her grandmother was crying as well.

Although her grandmother could not answer her question, a great loneliness had gone and she felt able to go on.  All the assurances that Peaches was in heaven had not given her this strength or peace.  “My grandmother was a lap, Rachel,” she told me, “a place of refuge.  I know a great deal about AIDS, but what I really want to be for my patients is a lap.  A place from which they can face what they have to face and not be alone.”

Taking refuge does not mean hiding from life.  It means finding a place of strength, the capacity to live the life we have been given with greater courage and sometimes even with gratitude.

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