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Archive for June 2nd, 2012

A new way of expanding Dharmic Ideas to everyday, embodied life. . .

Mindful Lifestyle - Devoted to Healing & Being

I think one of the problems with successful migraine maintenance is that there can be many comorbid conditions that you are experiencing… take a look at this post:

http://www.migrainesurvival.com/related-conditions

Most people don’t tend to get that migraines are a biopsychosocialspiritual dis-ease that affects ALL aspects of our lives. . . from how we manage our career and schooling, to mates we pick, to whether or not we have the energy for any kind of relationshps, to mood, perception, digestion, etc.  Look at the comorbid disorders. . . cardiovascular, metabolic, gastrointestinal, sleep, etc.

I am pretty convinced that my migraines started from some pretty drastic dietary changes I made and a sleep disorder that I helped to co-create.  I do believe that I had a predisposition to them as both of my parents have had headache problems over the years and the entire time I was growing up in CT, I had…

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“You cannot go into the room where someone is dying

and not pay attention.  Everything is

pulling you into the moment.”  ~~ Frank Ostaseki

In 1987, Frank Ostaseski helped form the Zen Hospice Project, the first Buddhist hospice in America. In 2004, he created Metta Institute to broaden this work and seed the culture with innovative approaches to end-of-life care that reaffirm the spiritual dimensions of dying.

I love listening to his 3 tape series entitled, Being a Compassionate Companion.  It has so much heart and he conveys the teachings of the Buddhist Path and the hospice experience in such a natural, gentle way.

In these three tapes, Frank gives guidance and explains these important teachings for cultivating a compassionate presence at the bedside:

Over the next few days, I will be sharing more about each of these precepts (teachings).

I hope that I can share what I learned from Frank and from working at hospice.  Most importantly, I hope that when you encounter another person, you learn to take a deep breath and settle in and truly open yourself to the experience.

More to come.

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