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Archive for the ‘Dukkha’ Category

Hang out with people who are capable of making a commitment to you and your life, and who require that you make a commitment to theirs. Hang out with people who care about you, with people who need you to develop and who say so. Make such a commitment and don’t break that bond until you and all beings are perfect.

~~Reb Anderson, “In It Together”

To my two oldest and dearest friends,

I know you don’t want to talk about Advanced Directives and dying;  I get it and I love you for willing to be my surrogates once my parents die and for making that kind of commitment to me.

But I felt like I needed to put this out to the universe because more and more of us aren’t having kids, aren’t marrying, are married to their work, travel all the times, etc.  So here goes.

My time being with you was oh so short but you left a mark on my heart, like you were a sharpie.  I cannot think of two kinder people.  Nor do I know anyone who would continue making a scared contact with me for lifetimes.

As I look back, at mid-life, I have stood on the shoulders of so many who were there to catapult me into different lessons I had to learn, or as Ondrea Levine has said, “the healing I took birth for”.  From first or second grade, I’ve lost a lot of people:

Grandma Stevens

Grace

Aunt Ida, her brother Harold, (the spitting image of my grandpa), Cora, & Marge (I was closest to Aunt Ida by proximity)

Grandma & Grandpa  Martin

Harris & Barb

Grandpa Stevens

Mike

Tommy & his partner

Mike

Mike from CARES

Keith (Lois’ friend from CARES)

Amy’s mom Franny

Lois

And those are people with whom I’m close, not to mention all of the people who I counseled through hospice and other places I’ve worked.

Most people would see a list of losses and not have a clue what to say.  But I do, at least from my POV and previous experiences.  And what do I say?  one people where they are at, even if you don’t agree with it.  Let these folks live on until you re-commit to doing this all over again and begin anew.

I heard, during hospice orientation, a wonderful nurse Mosier said, “It’s a privilege and an honor to work with our patients and their families.”  And oh my god, did I get it once I started having clients.  And why did I love the work?  Because people who are dying go for bullshit; most don’t play games.  They are themselves and either take to you in and love you or drop you like a hot potato.  Who has time for drama and for squabbles when there is so much to do.  And this idea and feeling got me through some of the roughest times.

So I hope you get that we all have some control over how we leave this world.  Tibetan masters used to pick out the day of their deaths so has not to leave an energy gap for his sangha.  Now thats’s crazy mad skills (which I do not possess.” But I want my say too.  This hospitalization for my migraines shown me that I don’t want to wait until the end of life as it’s no longer his/her dying, it’s The Dying or my dying.  I want to tell you I love you every time we are in contact.  I wish I could hug you each day for the rest of our lives, but I cannot in person, so I do it in my dreams.

I am so honored to be able to call each of you my friend; two of the very best as a matter of fact.  Each of you came into my life when I needed help, a boost, a friend and I’ve never been more grateful for anything.

My Advanced Directives are not macabre; they are life-affirming.  They are not going to make me die sooner nor are they a statement about how I feel about my life.  They are to tell you, the two I love the most, after my folks what the heck I want when I can’t speak for myself.  That’s a pretty intimate thing and I don’t take it lightly, but I also don’t take my friendships with you for granted.

It’s like handing you the flashlight to my heart, so that you can see what’s there.  I do not want to suffer and if I can’t be conscious of the love that surrounds me in this world, then  don’t want to be a part of it.  I want to be surrounded by love and peace.  I want to go out of this world, to wait for our next incarnation together.  I don’t want to live in fear of dying and I don’t want to suffer the way Mike did for years.  If I cannot see the beauty in the world, then it’s time.

I wish we all could have as much love and attention to those who are being born into dying as we do being born into this world.  I’ve seen magic happen.  Lois’ last year or 2 were amazing.  She lived her dying like the spiritual warrior and Earth Mother that she was and surrounded by little pink lights (that’s another story).

I think the greatest good in this world be companioning someone who is dying.  And if my folks are gone, I pray that I will have one or both of you to be there and we keep are commitments to each other.

And to those who read this blog, think about where you stand, and then for goodness’ sake, tell someone.  Get it in writing.  Because when its too late, it truly is too late.  And thank you for witnessing.   Invite the ones you love to the conversation and then love them every day.

Addendum:  I decided to publish this because more and more people aren’t getting married, having kids, whatever… they need to have the conversation with those who will be there in the end.  Don’t wait to be a golden girl to have THE TALK.

Blessings, Jen

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All violence is injustice.  Responding to violence with violence is injustice, not only to the other person but also to oneself.  Responding to violence with violence resolves nothing; it only escalates violence, anger, and hatred.  It is only with compassion that we can embrace and disintegrate violence.  This is true in relationships between individuals as well as in relationships between nations.

~~  Thich Nhat Hanh, “Cutivating Compassion to Respone to Violence”

This quote is a bit of a hard one to chew on right now.  First because it feels like we are enveloped in a violent world.

We’ve ravaged the planet.  Multiple countries are at war in the world and no one except, maybe France, has declared war. . . or so it seems. Our political candidates are inciting mobs to injure people and some are saying hateful things about certain groups that if the candidate laid a hand on the people they hate so much, it would be called a hate crime because of their protected status.

A war on drugs.  On cancer.  On the left.  On the right.  Women.  Abortion.  Christmas.  We seem to have a constant sale on wars and we can’t get enough.  And all of this violence and absolutely nothing feels just.

On a personal note, this quote is a bit tough to meditate on becuase I find myself getting so angry when I read Facebook.  I want to (and admit I sometimes do) post messages that are mean, name-calling, etc.  It is all just TOO much.

But then, I take a minute and reflect which then leads me to reflect on more things for more time.  One of the things I keep trying to bring to my mind’s eye is a picture from a Thich Nhat Hanh talk (I don’t remember if he said this in 2003 when I saw him or if it was an audio Dharma talk).

He said when you are seated on your cushion, sit tall and steady.  And place your hands on your lap, palms up, and imagine a baby Buddha sitting in your palms.  Hold your hands like you are cradling the baby Buddha and allow a half-smile to come to your face as you glance down at the baby.

I find when I can remember to do this, to take the time, it settles me.  I try to think, what if whomever I am angry at was the baby Buddha.  How would my anger, my frustration, my mindlessness affect the baby? Would I want to do that to the baby Buddha?

And lately, I have been asking myself, can you hold the whole planet like it is the baby Buddha?  Some days I can and I feel at peace.  Other days, I don’t think I can hold anything because I have fists, not open palms.

Right now, where are you?  Can you sit and imagine yourself as the baby Buddha?  The planet?  The person who cut you off on the parkway?  Your boss?  The person at the grocery store?  Can you imagine any little bit of love that can start to cool the embers that envelope us all on this planet?

Take gentle care and remember those around you are suffering just like you.

Love and peace, Jennifer

 

 

 

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Driving up to see my parents today, I was thinking about yesterday’s post. I wrote

How many times do we hold on to things we heard growing up?  How many times do we refuse to look at a thought because we can’t imagine who we would be without it?   ~ Let Your Ideas Go

As I was driving, I was thinking of how much hate there is in the world, but in particular, in this country.  Our education system is failing.  We have more and more people being home schooled with very little oversight.  If you never leave your home, how do you ever learn that what’s you have heard your whole life is garage?  Is lies?

What happens when you are taught generation after generation of hate, lies, misinformation, bigotry, etc? When you don’t get to socialize with others?  I think it was when I went to college when I finally found out how different other’s had grown up and what they had learned and believed.  

If we never have the opportunity to un-learn what we’ve learned or never have the chance to learn another side, how can we grow, thrive, trust, and foster compassion?

Has our rustic individualism, cowboy-mentality, racism/sexism, etc in our country created out uneducated, unempathetic, and unkind world?  Is there a way to turn back or is it that with social media and a total lack of privacy that we see that it’s always been this way?  Is this what has allowed people like Trump to exist and thrive and spew his hatred??

Thought?  Ideas?  Suggestions?  Comments?

Take Gentle Care, Jennifer

 

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It is hard to let go of things, harder to let go of ideas, and even harder to let go of spiritual pretensions. Over time, as we familiarize ourselves with the many subtle twists and turns of letting go, we begin to be more savvy about how ego steps in to appropriate the entire process. In the millions of mini-decisions we make day by day and moment by moment, we are challenged each time either to let go or to re-solidify.  ~~~  Judy Lief, “Letting Go”

This has been a huge topic in my life this year and I finally came to grips with the face that I needed to sit with this topic or go mad.  Well, not really.  More like be mad, frustrated, hurt, angry, disappointed, betrayed, etc.  And I think I could write 100 blogs articles on this topic and never feel satisfied.  But from now until my next birthday, March, I plan to look at this topic, again and again, to see what truth it holds for me.

The hardest thing to let go of this year was a long time friendship. . . no the long, long ones, but someone who I’ve known about 10 years and had immense faith in up until recently.

It’s so painful to feel betrayed and lose the fidelity of someone you consider to be family, to be a sister, and someone whom you’ve shared the intimate stories of your life.

I’ve long known that friendships did not last forever.  I’ve lived in many places and have lost touch with people mostly because we were out of proximity.  I few people I’ve even turned away from when my grief was too much and I could not take the energy expenditure it took to keep up with the friendship.

And what I have found with time is that letting go of idea, belief, quest, dream, person, etc. is that there are layers and layers to let go of.  For example, when Mike died, I lost a brother.  I lost my big brother.  I lost the person whom I looked up to, especially on things of culture as he loved music, fashion, the arts, cooking, etc.  I miss that influence in my life.  Genetically, he was the person closest to me in the world.  And for those of you who haven’t lost a sibling, that might not make sense and I hope you never have occasion to “get it”.

But just as this was true for Mike or Harris & Barb, or anyone else I have loved, it is true of our dreams, our fears, and our desires.

I ask you to join me, in the months ahead, to look at your life and see what no longer fits, what hurts, what you never use, what you can’t have because there is no space in your life, or who you need to let go, by choice or my circumstance.

Ask yourself:  How does this benefit my life today?  Does it bring me closer to my dreams?  Does it connect to the deepest part of me?  Can I trust this person?  Do I trust them enough to bring up the subject and work through the problem?  What about your health, your mental health, your body, etc?    Are there things you need to let go of, release out into the cosmos?  Do you need to say goodbye to stress, anxiety, mindless eating, anger, a stale job, or habits that do nothing or perhaps harm you?  Ask yourself what are you willing to look at?  Do you have support as you look at these things?  Maybe even start of with that question first — if you are going to let go and allow healing to occur, who is there to support you in your process?

Feel free to share via post or email.  If you use the Ask Here tab, you can email and if you tell me not to share it in a post, I will happily respect that request.

May your heart know great love and gentleness.

Jennifer

 

 

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This morning, I was reading a Facebook post by Robert Reich.  I had seen his commentaries on Facebook and in the last week, what I have seen has appeared normal, sane, and much more positive than a lot of other things out there.  So, I decided to “like” him on Facebook so I could read more things from him.

Just after this morning’s post, I know he is a man with a lot to say, both from his intellect and from his heart.  He described being with his 102 year old dad and feeling the need to hide our current state of affairs from him and I totally get that.  And I have a lot of respect for him wanting to shelter his dad from the enormity of just how crazy and scary our world is right now.

How many things his dad has lived through!  My grandfather would be 102 in Feb ’16 if he were still alive.  One of my dad’s cousins just posted that her dad would be 100 years old if he was alive too.  How to even imagine what it means to have lived for 100 years, let alone the last 100 years in the world.   I think back to when Mike died 20 years ago or even Lois dying 15 years ago.  It’s painful to search for people you loved (love) and find no trace of them on the net.  It’s like they didn’t exist.  You can find everything on the net, right?

Even as a child, I was curious about the fight between good and bad, light and dark, saviors and villains.  Maybe it was all the Catholic school teachings?  Maybe it was just from seeing movies, news, tv, etc.  Maybe those “inherent” dichotomies are just born into us?  I’m not sure.  But this is something I think of, time to time, when I let my world get quiet.  We’ve come so far in the treatment of HIV and AIDS.  And yet, where would we be if the US was not so slow to talk about it.  Thank goodness for Rock Hudson and Reagan having HIV sitting in his living room.

On one hand, we have fewer and fewer people acknowledging any religious tradition and many of us do not turn to Judeo-Christian religions for our ethics and morals, or our solace when nothing makes sense.  But we do have people who have made it their spiritual journey to fight for the planet, those less fortunate, those with particular illnesses, and I think that should be commended.

We don’t have to kneel in the pews to praise the glory of the dawn or the expanses of the universe or hold intentions that the hate in the world will one day dissipate.  We have more kids, young kids, trying to solve the problems in the world — the kid who wants to clean the plastic out of the oceans, a 10 year old who sings to the elderly, a 13 year old that sends teddy bears to kids in Haiti after the earthquake, etc, etc.  Maybe listening to our children makes more sense than to listen to the vile hate and evil on the tv and internet today.  You know, the reports of cities make it illegal to feed a homeless person or setting up metal spikes to keep them from holding up outside of buildings.  Or those who spew hate about a particular religion or people. . .

I try to stay away from the news, and try to focus on my world and try to figure out how to break the confines of hate, gossip, treachery, and ill will.  I try to work with those things within my own heart and mind because if I can’t how do I expect anyone else to?  If I can’t what makes me think anyone else will take on that huge task, especially alone like I currently am.

But folks, it’s not a time to give up easily or to flirt with things like spirituality, rightness, goodness, kindness, advocacy, community, etc.  I think we need to take a stand.  Hundreds of people took a stand during WWII.  And I mention WWII because I am a bit of an amateur historian when it comes to the segregation, hostility, brain washing, mass evil that has come to be a part of the history of that time.  And though the world said, let we not forget, I think we have forgotten in the gravest ways.  Where has this rise in antisemitism taken off like a wild fire?  How long have we allowed China to create its own Holocaust within Tibet?  Why do we stand for the mass extinction of our lands, our world that feeds us and can help us to stay whole and healthy?  When does the side of good rise up and do something about all the dangers?

I honestly don’t know what I would do if I were Prof Reich.  I applaud his love and need to protect his dad.  And I bet his father has a world of wisdom to share with us after living for so long.  I hope as a scholar, not a son, the professor has archived his father’s thoughts, ideas, and wisdom.  Heck, I know I want to archive the silly little songs my dad has sung to me while I was growing up or the feel of a hug from him or mom, or to learn every one of mom’s recipes by heart, to have something of her close to me.

I have to admit, I long for the 1980s, yes, beyond just the music (Depeche Mode forever).  I was in my teens, I had two hart working parents and a pain in the neck older brother.  I still had grandparents.  I still lived in the places I had always known.  I had friends, had created friendships, that would still be with me today.  I learned how to be charitable with my time whether it was hanging out on a Friday night to give drunk kids rides or it was going to The Jewish Home for the Elderly of Fairfield and giving love to wise old lonely people when I could get their after school.  Whatever was going on in the world, I think we were sheltered, or at least I was.  I didn’t even realize the person who slept in the bedroom next to mine had HIV.  It was still a time of innocence for me.

And may in our old age, we want to recreate an age of innocence for those older adults that we love.  We want them not to fear the world since aging and dying can be such big fears.  Maybe we want to create a time, like after birth, when the baby is so loved and we are so mindful of their every accomplishment and every beautiful breath?  Wouldn’t it be lovely to have friends make quilts and blankets, and stop by with flowers, or pick up prescriptions, or just to send a not of love?

I am so honored that Prof Reich shared such a deep a meaningful situation from his own life with us.  We are so much stronger, so much more human, when we can be ourselves and share who we are from the heart.  This is the kind of person who I want to know more about. . . his father too.  These are the people who have integrity and want to see good come from this little experiment on this planet that we all signed up for. . .life.

The battle between good and evil will always be there, as long as humans are there.  I pray with every person who takes up a microphone to speak out against Muslims, or people of color, or the President, that there are just as many people encouraging our brave kids to do better to help the world.  I hope there are more people learning yoga and sitting on their zafu.  I hope there are more people who rise to see the sun return to us as they sit and are thankful for the grace in this world.  And I hope there are just as many in the wee hours of the night, finishing school programs, writing songs, praying for world peace, and looking into their own hearts.  I add enough anger, frustration, lack of caring into the world and I need to recommit myself to being that young girl who saw the beauty and awe leaving early for school just to be closer to the Divine.  I need to remember who I am which is an advocate, an educator, and hopefully a person to planet peace in the darkest places.

Prof Reich, wherever you are, I wish you love and peace as you spend time with your dad.  I hope you feel the strength, power, and wisdom of your community as you enjoy each moment with him.  And, probably most importantly, I hope you feel my gratitude for you being genuine and sharing the bittersweetness in want to protect your dad.

Namaste!

May the merit of all our good flow into the universe a thousand-fold.

May the love we feel for those close to us also reach those people who feel unlovable.

May those we love never doubt that we love them with our whole existence and we would not betray the sacredness of them or our relationship to them.

May the merit of every word, every song, every syllable, every breath keep hope alive that there is a different way and we can find a peaceful existence in this threatening world.

Metta, now and always,

Jennifer

 

 

 

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The Third Noble Truth. . .   There is an end to suffering. But how?  Don’t you think if everyone knew there was a way we’d all be signing up?  Ani Pema Chodron writes in Comfortable with Uncertainty, “. . . suffering ceases when we let go of trying to maintain the huge ME at any cost.  This is what we practice in meditation. When we let go of thinking and the story line, we’re left just sitting with the quality and the energy of whatever particular ‘weather’ we’ve been trying to resist.”    What?  Okay, no wonder were not lining up around the corner.  I love Ani Pema but what does this mean in real terms?

The cessation of suffering is to put an end to the cravings, clinging, desire, ignorance, obsession and more.

Oh, okay.  Wait, what?  We can stop suffering by stopping are ignorance and desire?  We can stop it when we let go and stop clinging?  That’s great!  Wait, who would I be without my attachment or my perseverating?  How can I stop wanting?  I’m sure there will be an iSomething out soon. . .  and I will HAVE TO HAVE IT!

Wait, there’s more. . .

When suffering is stopped, there is also no more rebirth, suffering, and no dying again.  This is the liberation of all beings from the cycle.  Then we are free.

Mandy Barrow, on resources.woodlands-junior.ket.school, a homework resource for kids in the UK, interprets the Third Noble Truth like this:  “The third truth is that suffering can be overcome and happiness can be attained; that true happiness and contentment are possible.  If [we] let go of our craving and learn to live each day at a time (not dwelling in the past or the imagined future) then we can become happy and free.  We then have more time and energy to help others.  This is Nirvana”.

We have so many stories in our heads.   We have so many wishes in our hearts.  And the more impossible they are, the more we probably want them, and the more we want them, the more suffering we have.  I have some that I am not sure I will ever want to let go of, no matter how much pain they cause.  To me, some of these stories, at least right now, are the breath that keeps me alive.  But if I want contentment, peace, ease, am I willing to let go of that which I grasp onto the tightest?

I think it’s so important to do this work (see the upcoming post on the Eight-fold Path) with the Buddha,  Dharma, and the Sangha.  They are our inspiration, our safety net, they are our teacher, and our support.  If the journey was easy, a lot more of us shining in our contentment.  But there isn’t. . . whenever starting a journey into the unknown, make sure you have your tools, your guide, and your desire to let go.

And the best news, the Buddha gave us the tools.  The Fourth Noble Truth is the tool, the ultimate tool.  The Fourth Noble Truth is that they way out of our suffering is The Eight-fold Path.  Over the next few days, in addition to other things, I will write about The Path.

Until then, ask yourself some gentle, kind, questions and just sit with what answers come up for you.  What would you be without your storyline?  You desires?  You want for a different outcome?  Who would you be if you were not always right?  Who are you, stripped down of all the trim and trappings?  Are you ready to sit and be present to whoever it is you find?

With deep respect and honor,

Jennifer

 

 

 

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In his book, Peace Begins Here, Thich Nhat Hanh writes:  “Despair is the worst thing that can happen to us.”  He was a young monk during the war in Vietnam and he knew that those around him were suffering and feeling like no hope was in sight; maybe hope wasn’t even possible.  After being silent for quite awhile, Thay said to those around him:  “Dear Friends, the Buddha said everything is impermanent.  The war has to end one day.”  He felt this was important for people to hear at that moment.  He hoped that they realized there were things for them to do to life themselves out of the despair, once they realized that that’s where they were.

And as I was reading, I thought these were important words to live by, for me, here and now, both on the global level and the individual level.  Right now, I am facing a difficult situation, a bit of a crossroads and don’t know which way to go and since I am not clear, I find that I can get trapped right where I am, stagnant, fretting, wondering, conjecturing, etc.  And what does that do but wake up me up at 3am.  It saps my energy, makes me cranky, increases my stress, I have more pain on more days, and shut down and off, alienating myself from the few people right around me that care.

Isn’t that how I, and much of the world, feels right now about the situation with our planet melting, children going hungry, the rich getting richer, it being illegal to feed a homeless person, people being killed because they show up to help people at the job at Planned Parenthood and are being killed, etc.  Or they go to a movie, a game, a holiday party a restaurant and are being bombed.  We are paralyzed by fear and smoldering anger that we don’t know what to do with, that we cannot fathom there is anything that we can do with that intense level of emotion.  We get stuck, we stew, we head to Facebook or Twitter and rip into someone or some idea.  We get barely a second of satisfaction but it’s hallow and it doesn’t last.  All it does is exercise our anger muscles, making them stronger.  Sounds like my life is a mere echo of what so many in the world are feeling today.

But in his book, Thay goes on to say,  “It is very important to find out what we can do every day so that we don’t drown in an ocean of despair.”  He explains further that there are Israelis who do not agree with their government and speak out and they need to be supported.  At the same time, there are Israelis who refuse to go to war because they know it is wrong.  Does that change the pain and suffering of the Palestinians?  Yes and no.  Does it solve the bigger picture or end the war, hate, and deaths?  No.  There is no simple answers or remedies to that.  Does it help to know that there are people on both sides who want peace and do not want to see one more generation of people killed?  Yes.  It helps to give you a bigger perspective, to move from fear and anger into feelings of unity, cooperation, and hope.

We can’t always wait for sweeping gestures or one final solution to a conflict, global or not.  Some times it is the simple smile or acknowledgement by a stranger that can snap us into a different frame of mind.  We move ourselves from the perspective of being stuck, overwhelmed, and seeing no way out to having some sort of options.  Or we know someone else out there feels similar about a situation.  It’s a sliver of light in a dark universe.  It’s the seed of change being watered and cared for until it becomes a seedling.

In my own situation, it does me no good to sit and brood about my problems or to wallow in the Poor Mes.  I’ve done it, sat in it and it’s time to change that diaper.  So I do not have the power to change my ultimate outcome but I can change my perspective on the path from here to there.  I can educate myself, talk to others, do something for others, reach out, ask for help, sit with the painful feelings and fear and work to accept that right now, that’s where I am at.  I can blog, meditate, visualize, ask questions, listen, inject humor.  And like in Logotherapy, I can think of and feel the most outrageous thing associated with my situation, the things I fear the most, deep down within my cells, and see the absurdity or anxiety which stems from those fears.  Then I am able to move through feeling paralyzed to action, advocacy, helping others, etc.

Everything in life is impermanent. . .  this election cycle, global warming, all of the hatred for people who are “the other”.  Our health, our age, our relationships, our grief, our illness, our vocation, our material things. . .  none of them last in this existence, in the same way, unchanging forever.  That takes some of the pressure off.  It lifts us out of option reduction and narrow thinking to realize that things will change when we take a minute (or longer).  I think despair is even more deadly, darker, more stuck than hate or anger.  I think that despair can be the quagmire that some cannot turn back from.

So here are my questions to you (and to myself):  where are you, here and now, in your ideas, feelings, perceptions, relationships, grief, boredom, etc?  Where are the areas of your life that you cannot imagine ever changing, ever being better, ever being worse?  What is it like for you to be with that?  If you sit with the idea and feeling that something in your life that matters, good or bad, will not last, will be gone, what comes up for you?  What arises when you think of your health disappearing?  Your youth?  The love of your life?  Your enemy?  What are the things that bring up loss in your heart?  Can you let them light in your heart?

One of the most amazingly healing things that I have ever done, and I know I have written about it before, is the tapes/cds, by Stephen and Andrea Levine, The Heart of Grief.  They describe the huge painful losses and griefs, the small daily ones, the ones we don’t think we want to live after, the ones that make us or break us.  Its a good program to listen to when you want to meditate on impermanent.  There are also meditations that you can do, such as ones on end-of-life. . . but start off small.  Don’t take on the huge issues, especially without support.  Find a mediation buddy or teacher or sangha or therapist.  And if you never heed these words about anything else in life, heed them on your journey. . . take gentle care of yourself.

In light and hope,

Jennifer

 

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